Signing GitHub Commits With A Passphrase-protected Key and GPG2

GitHub recently added support for signed commits. The instructions for setting it up can be found on their website and I do not intend to rehash them here. I followed those instructions and they work splendidly. However, when I set mine up, I had used the version of GPG that came with my Git installation. A side effect I noticed was that if I were rebasing some code and wanted to make sure the rebased commits were still signed (by running git rebase with the -S option), I would have to enter my passphrase for the GPG key for every commit (which gets a little tedious after the first five or so).

Shows some commits on GitHub with the Verified indicator showing those that have been signed
How GitHub shows signed commits

Now, there are a couple of ways to fix this. One is easy; just don't use a passphrase protected key. Of course, that would make it a lot easier for someone to sign commits as me if they got my key file, so I decided that probably was not the best option. Instead, I did a little searching and found that GPG2 supports passphrase protected keys a little better than the version of GPG I had installed as part of my original git installation.

Using the GPG4Win website, I installed the Vanilla version1. I then had to export the key I had already setup with GitHub from my old GPG and import it into the new. Using gpg --list-keys, I obtained the 8 character ID for my key (the bit that reads BAADF00D in this example output):

Which I then used to export my keys from a Git prompt:

This gave me two files ( privatekey.txt and publickey.txt) containing text representations of the private and public keys.

Using a shell in the GPG2 pub folder ( "C:\Program Files (x86)\GNU\GnuPG\pub"), I then verified them (always a good practice, especially if you got the key from someone else) before importing them2:

And rather than give me details of the key, it showed me this error:

What was going on? I tried verifying it with the old GPG and it gave me a different but similar error:

I tried the public key export and it too gave these errors. It did not make a whole heap of sense. Trying to get to the bottom of it, I opened the key files in Visual Studio Code. Everything looked fine until I saw this at the bottom of the screen.

Encoding information from Visual Studio Code showing UTF16
Encoding information from Visual Studio Code

It turns out that Powershell writes redirected output as UTF-16 and I had not bothered to check. Thinking this might be the problem, I resaved each file as UTF-8 and tried verifying privatekey.txt again:

Success! Repeating this for the publickey.txt file gave the exact same information. With the keys verified, I was ready to import them into GPG2:

With the keys imported, I ran gpg --list-keys to verify they were there and then made sure to delete the text files.

Finally, to make sure that Git used the new GPG2 instead of the version of GPG that it came with, I edited my Git configuration:

Now, when I sign commits and rebases, instead of needing to enter my passphrase for each commit, I am prompted for the passphrase once. Lovely.


  1. You could also look at installing the command line tools from https://www.gnupg.org/download/ though I do not know if the results will be the same 

  2. Note that I am not showing the path to the file here for the sake of brevity, though I am sure you get the idea that you'll need to provide it 

Getting Information About Your Git Repository With C#

During a hackathon not so long ago, I wanted to incorporate some source control data into my .NET assembly version information for the purposes of troubleshooting installations, making it easier for people to report the code in which they found a bug, and making it easier for people to find the code in which a bug was found1. The plan was to automatically encode the branch, the commit hash, and whether there were local commits or local changes into the AssemblyConfiguration attribute of my assemblies during the build.

At the time, I hacked together the RepositoryInformation class below that wraps the command line tool to extract the required information. This class supported detecting if the directory is a repository, checking for local commits and changes, getting the branch name and the name of the upstream branch, and enumerating the log. Though it felt a little wrong just wrapping the command line (and seemed pretty fragile too), it worked. Unfortunately, it was dependent on git being installed on the build system; I would prefer the build to get everything it needs using package management like NuGet and npm2.

If I were to approach this again today, I would use the LibGit2Sharp NuGet package or something similar3. Below is an updated version of RepositoryInformation that uses LibGit2Sharp instead of git command line. Clearly, you could forego any type of wrapper for LibGit2Sharp and I probably would if I were incorporating this into a bigger task like the one I originally had planned.

I have yet to use any of this outside of my hackathon work or this blog entry, but now that I have resurrected it from my library of coding exploits past to write about, I might just resurrect the original plans I had too. Whether that happens or not, I hope you found this useful or at least a little interesting; if so, or if you have some suggestions related to this post, please let me know in the comments.


  1. Sometimes, like a squirrel, you want to know which branch you were on 

  2. I had looked at NuGet packages when I was working on the original hackathon project, but had decided not to use one for some reason or another (perhaps the available packages did not do everything I wanted at that time)  

  3. PowerShell could be a viable replacement for my initial approach, but it would suffer from the same issue of needing git on the build system; by using a NuGet package, the build includes everything it needs 

Git integration for all your PowerShells with Github for Windows

We use git for our source control at work. In fact, we use Github. I have GitHub for Windows (GfW) installed because it's one of the easiest ways to install git on a Windows desktop. As part of the installation, you get to choose how the git shell is provided; I selected PowerShell (PS). This works well. You can access the integrated console via a separate shortcut or by the ~ key when viewing a repository in GfW.

However, the git integration (provided by posh-git) isn't available in the standard PS console nor PS ISE1. I use PS ISE a lot more these days as it gives me tabbed console windows and some cool features like auto-complete dropdowns2, so I wanted git integration there too.

As I already have git and posh-git installed via GfW, I didn't want to install both separately again just to get this support, I wanted to use what was already there.

To do this, open your PS or PS ISE console (you'll need to do this for both as they have separate profiles) and enter:

Then add the following lines and save:

To see the changes, you need to restart your console. If you're sure there'll be no nasty side-effects from running your profile twice in one session, you could also just enter:

And there you have it, git support using the GitHub for Windows installation in all your PowerShell windows.


  1. Integrated Scripting Environment 

  2. There are some caveats to using the ISE console tab over a regular PS console