C#7: Tools

I have spent the first couple of months of 2017 learning about the new features in C#7. This would not have been possible without some tools to help me play around with the new language syntax and associated types. Since we have to wait a little longer until Visual Studio 2017 is released, I thought you might like to know what tools I have been using to tinker in all things C#7.

LINQPad Beta

Link: http://www.linqpad.net/Download.aspx#beta

While early releases of Visual Studio 2017 (scheduled for release on March 7th) support the language, I initially found the release candidate to be unstable and frustrating. Not only that, but it can be cumbersome to spin up a quick example using Visual Studio, so I turned to my trusty friend, LINQPad.

LINQPad Beta showing me my return is missing a ref
LINQPad Beta showing me my return is missing a ref

I cannot recommend LINQPad enough, it is a fantastic tool for prototyping, poking around data sources, and more besides, like tinkering with language features you don't yet understand. While LINQPad's current release only supports the C# language up to version 61, the beta release also supports C# version 7. Not only can you use the language, but with the fantastic analysis window, you can see how Roslyn breaks down each part of the code. If you want to get started quickly, easily play around with the cool new features, and have a powerful tool for digging deeper as the need arises, the LINQPad beta is the tool to get.

Visual Studio 2017 RC

Link: https://www.visualstudio.com/downloads/

Visual Studio 2017 RC splash
Visual Studio 2017 RC splash

Yes, I know I said it was unstable and frustrating, but that was before, way back in January. These days the RC is much, much better and with the release date set for March 7th, there was never a better time to install Visual Studio 2017 RC and get a head start on getting to know some of the new things it can do, including C# 7. Tuples are fun, but poking around with them in the debugger is funner.

OzCode

Link: https://oz-code.com/

Pattern matching in OzCode
Pattern matching in OzCode

It is no secret that I love OzCode, the magical debugging extension for Visual Studio. It is so well-known that they asked me to be part of their OzCode Magician community program. So, it should come as no surprise that I have been using OzCode in my exploration of C#7. As the Visual Studio 2017 RC has matured, the clever people over at CodeValue have been creating previews of OzCode version 3, including amazing LINQ debugging support. Recently, I got to try an internal build that included support for all the cool new things in C#7.

OzCode 3 will be released on March 7th, the same day as Visual Studio 2017.

Documentation

Link: https://docs.microsoft.com/dotnet/articles/csharp/csharp-7

Never underestimate the power of reading documentation, it is one of the best tools out there. For my C#7 posts, I relied heavily on the new docs.microsoft.com site, specifically the .NET articles on C#. Not only is this a fantastic resource, but it has built-in support for commenting on the documentation so that you can ask questions and contribute to their improvement.

In Conclusion

This is the entire list of tools I used for my C#7 investigations. Try them out and get an early start on C#7 fun before the March 7th release of all the C#7 goodness. Happy tinkering and if you stumble on any useful tools, please share in the comments!


  1. It also supports SQL, F#, and VB 

Caching with LINQPad.Extensions.Cache

One of the tools that I absolutely adore during my day-to-day development is LINQPad . If you are not familiar with this tool and you are a .NET developer, you should go to www.linqpad.net right now and install it. The basic version is free and feature-packed, though I recommend upgrading to the professional version. Not only is it inexpensive, but it also adds some great features like Intellisense1 and Nuget package support.

I generally use LINQPad as a simple coding environment for poking around my data sources, crafting quick coding experiments, and debugging. Because LINQPad does not have the overhead of a solution or project, like a development-oriented tool such as Visual Studio, it is easy to get stuck into a task. I no longer write throwaway console or WinForms apps; instead I just throw together a quick LinqPad query. I could continue on the virtues of this tool2, but I would like to touch on one of its utility features.

As part of LINQPad , you get some useful methods and types for extending LINQPad , dumping information to LINQPad's output window, and more. Two of these methods are LINQPad.Extensions.Cache and Utils.Cache. Using either Cache method, you can execute some code and cache the result locally, then use the cached value for all subsequent runs of that query. This is incredibly useful for caching the results of an expensive database query or computationally-intensive calculation. To cache an IEnumerable<T>  or IObservable<T>  you can do something like this:

Or, since it's an extension method,

For other types, Util.Cache  will cache the result of an expression.

The first time I run my LINQPad code, my lazily evaluated query or the expression is executed by the Cache method and the result is cached. From then on, each subsequent run of the code uses the cached value. Both Cache methods also take an optional name for the cached item, in case you want to differentiate items that might otherwise be indistinguishable (such as caching a loop computation).

This is, as I alluded earlier, one of many utilities provided within LINQPad that make it a joy to use. What tools do you find invaluable? Do you already use LINQPad ? What makes it a must have tool for you? I would love to hear your responses in the comments.

Updated to correct casing of LINQPad, draw attention to Cache being an extension method for some uses, and adding note of Util.Cache3.


  1. including for imported data types from your data sources 

  2. such as its support for F#, C#, SQL, etc. or its built-in IL disassembly 

  3. because, apparently, I am not observant to this stuff the first time around. SMH