Testing AngularJS: $resource

This is the fourth post taking a look at testing various aspects of AngularJS. Previously, I covered:

In this installment we'll take a look at what I do to isolate components from their use of the $resource service and why.

$resource

The $resource service provides a simple way to define RESTful API endpoints in AngularJS and get updated data without lots of promise handling unnecessarily obfuscating your code. If you have created a resource for a specific route, you can get the returned data into your scope as easily as this:

The $resource magic ensures that once the request returns, the data is updated. It's clever stuff and incredibly useful.

However, when testing components that use resources, I want to isolate the components from those resources. While I could use $httpBackend or a cache to manipulate what results the resource returns, these can be cumbersome to setup and adds unnecessary complexity and churn to unit tests1. To avoid this complexity, I use a fake that can be substituted for $resource.

spyResource

My fake $resource is called spyResource. It is not quite a 1-1 replacement, but it does support the more common situations one might want (and it could be extended to support more). Here it is.

First of all, it is just a function. Since it is part of my testing framework, there is no need to wrap it in some fancy AngularJS factory, though we certainly could if we wanted.

Second, it mimics the $resource service by returning a function that ultimately copies itself. This is useful because you do not necessarily have access to the instances of a resource that are created in your code before posting an object update to your RESTful API. By copying itself, you can see if the $save() call is made directly from the main spyResource definition, even if it was actually called on an instance returned by it because they share the same spies.

To use this in testing, the $provide service can be used to replace a specific use of $resource with a spyResource. For example, if you defined a resource called someResource, you might have:

Now, the fake resource will be injected instead of the real one, allowing us to not only spy on it, but to also ensure there are no side-effects that we have not explicitly set up.

Finally…

I have covered a very simple technique I use for isolating components from and spying on their usage of AngularJS resources. The simple fake resource I provided for this purpose can be easily tailored to cater to more complex scenarios. For example, if the code under test needs data from the get() method or the $promise property is expected in get() return result, the spy can be updated to return that data.

Using this fake resource instead of $httpBackend or a cache to manipulate the behavior of a real AngularJS resource not only simplifies the testing in general, but also reduces code churn by isolating the tests from the API routes that can often change during development.

As always, please leave a comment if you find this useful or have other feedback.

 

 


  1. API routes can often change during development, which would lead to updating $httpBackend test code so that it matches 

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