Testing AngularJS: Asynchrony

So far, we have looked at some techniques for testing simple AngularJS factories and directives. However, things are rarely simple when it comes to web development and one area that complicates things is that of asynchronous operations such as web requests, timeouts and promises.

Eventually, when writing AngularJS, you will rely on the $timeout, $interval, or $q services to defer an action by some interval or indefinitely using promises. I will not go very deep into their use here, you can read much of that on the AngularJS documentation, but since it is likely that you will use them, how do you test them? How do you test asynchronous code without horribly complex and unreliable tests?

$timeout

Consider this simple example where we have a controller that defers some action using $timeout.

Here we have a variable, started that is initialised to false and a deferred method that changes that value to true. A first stab at testing this might look a little like this:

Unfortunately, such a test will not pass because the deferred code would not execute until after the expectation was tested. We can mitigate this by using some AngularJS magic provided by the ngMock module.

The ngMock module adds the $timeout.flush() method so that code deferred using $timeout can be executed deterministically1. The test can therefore be modified such that it passes by adding the highlighted line below.

$q

For promises that were deferred using $q (including the promise returned from using $interval), we can use $scope.$apply() to complete a resolved or rejected promise and execute any code depending on that promise.

In the following contrived example, we have a controller with a start() method that returns a promise and a started() method that resolves that promise.

The preceding test validates our controller and its promise. If you delete the highlighted line, you would see that the test fails because the resolved promise is never completed.

Finally…

In this post, we have taken a brief look at how AngularJS supports the testing of asynchronous code execution deferred using $timeout, $interval, or $q. The ability to synchronously control otherwise asynchronous actions not only allows us to test that deferred code, but also to prevent it executing at all. This can be incredibly useful when isolating different parts of our code by reducing how much of it has to run to validate a specific method.

Of course, quite often, a promise is only resolved after an HTTP request responds or fails, such as when using $resource. When writing unit tests, you may not have nor want the luxury of a back-end server that responds appropriately to test requests. Instead, you either want to fake out $resource, or fake out and validate the HTTP requests and responses2. In upcoming posts, we'll look at a simple $resource fake for the former and the special $httpBackend service that AngularJS provides for the latter. Until then, please leave your comments.


  1. The flush() method even takes a delay parameter to control which timeouts will execute and a similar method exists for $interval 

  2. The requests that you expect your code to make and the responses that your code expects to receive – or doesn't, as the case may be 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *